Thursday, February 9, 2012

The Flintstones in
"Hollyrock Holiday" & "Popularity Contest"

Here comes a couple from The Flintstones No. 6, July-August 1962. I'm not sure who the artist, but my best guess is Harvey Eisenberg (always a safe bet with Hannah Barbera characters) - or maybe Kay Wright (It is Kay Wright on story art - check out comments). Whomever held the brush, great cartooning was done. I love the detail in many of these panels as they really flesh out the Bedrock world! Yabba-Dabba Do!

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25 comments:

  1. Hi there, Mykal.

    Eisenberg drew the cover, but Karran "Kay" Wright did the interior stories.And he was quite good at that time...

    Best,
    Alberto

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  2. Alberto: Quite good, indeed. Thanks, Alberto!

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  3. Yay you're back... my withdrawls are over...

    Yabba Dabba DO keep postin,' Brother! :)

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  4. Albie: Will yabba dabba DO, brother!

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  5. I think I love the Flinstones comics more than the actual cartoon. When the show is on TV I never care to watch it, but if I see a comic I'm drawn to it.

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  6. KW: I know what you mean, although I Love, Love, Love the Flintstones cartoons. The comics, at least at the hands of an artist like Kay Wright (thanks, Alberto!), can make the Flintstones' world deeper - richer in detail.

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  7. At last, another post! As someone who constantly fails to update their blog, I can sympathize, but I still am disappointed when the blogs I enjoy don't get updated as often as I'd like. Yes, I DO have an unwarranted sense of entitlement. :^D

    Thank Goodness that Alberto stepped in to identify the artists, I was going crazy trying to figure it out!

    Speaking of great Flintstone's art, Mykal, have you ever seen any of the work Dick Bickenbach (SP?) did on the H/B comics published by Marvel in the seventies? Gorgeous stuff!

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  8. Bill: I'll do may utmost to be more timely in future! I am glad Alberto (Becattini) stepped in, too, as he is want to do often with great info!

    I have not seen DB work on B'B comics (Marvel in the 1070s??) - You have given me a project!

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  9. It was a great line while it lasted. Written and edited by Mark Evanier, with art by cartoonists like Dan Spiegle, DB, Scott Shaw and more.

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  10. I am really going to have to track some of that down. What was the name of the comic or comics?

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  11. They were just titled "The Flintstones", "Yogi Bear", "Hanna-Barbera All-Stars", etc. Published by Marvel in the 70's. That's all I know. I lost track of my issues years ago. Mayhap one of your eagle-eyed readers can help?

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  12. The GCD lists the following issues as Dick Bickenbach: Flintstones #7, Yogi Bear #4, 6 (these from Marvel in 1978)

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  13. These Dell Flintstones comics are fun. I will also agree that original 1960's series of The Flintstones is perhaps one of the best Hanna-Barbera cartoons ever produced. Once the novelty of the stone-age gimmick wears off, the show has to be able to stand on it's characters and stories, which it does well (much better than The Jetsons did. Fred and the rest are inherently funny personalities, and can drive a story better than the more bland Jetsons can).

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  14. Debbie: Man I love the Flintstones, but the beauty of the Jetsons was the clever satire in the writing regarding modern society (then modern society) and the nearly clairvoyant knack for predicting the future of gadgets - also the background paintings were amazing.

    The Flintstones were hall of fame stuff, for sure, though. As you point out, the character development was the key to success as well as the adult stories. I remember watching that show in prime time as a kid, and it making my parents laugh.

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  15. Mykal,

    Don't forget that Karran "Kay" Wright drew that Flintstones Christmas special giant comic book (The Flinstones Christmas Party), which was published by Marvel in 1977, which's a special crossover involving the Flintstones, the Jetsons and all that batch of Hanna-Barbera classical characters (including Yogi Bear, Huckleberry Hound, Quick Draw McGraw, Snagglepuss, Top Cat, Wally Gator, Magilla Gorilla and many others).

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    1. One more detail to ponderate, Mykal: The Flintstones Christmas Party was scripted by Mark Evanier (Groo The Wanderer).

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    2. Sir - thanks for the info. Mr. Evanier scripted so many great stories around this time.

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  16. Well .... I've added "The Spectre Lives" to my links section; or in other words - here we go again!

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  17. I hear you, Chuck. This one, I believe I'll stick with for a long time - as I have this huge collection of Spectre comics and I've set the blog up so that entries are fairly easy to do.

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  18. Mykal: I agree, I also love the art design and gadgetry of The Jetsons (and the background music, too). It's also fun to see what they got right (and wrong) in predicting the future. At the same time, watching all three of Hanna-Barbera's 1960's prime-time comedies (The Flintstones, Top Cat and The Jetsons), you can see that their hearts were mostly in The Flintstones, and put more effort into keeping the Modern Stone-Age Family on top than into launching the two newer series. Top Cat is one of my all-time favorites, but even I have to admit, it's hard to imagine a second season of the show. (And the less said about the 1985-87 Jetsons revival, the better!)

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  19. Hey, Debbie! I agree about the pair really loving the Flintstones best. I remember seeing a film clip in one of the Flintstone DVD extras of the two talking about the show, and it was like they were talking about their first born. Joe Barbara challenged William Hanna to sing the Flintstones theme song complete from start to finish, and Hanna immediately broke into song and nailed it perfectly (with a great deal of pride).

    What Top Cat had going for it, I think, was an incredible sense of cool. It was all very New York and hip somehow. And, yes, I have to grudgingly agree: TC ran his course in one season (TC had the best theme song of them all, though).

    Someday, I am going to appreciate Magilla Gorilla more - I have a feeling that show is going to creep up on my one of these days. And for all its cult following, I have yet to love Johnny Quest. I'm hoping for a light to go on.

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  20. Magilla Gorilla is really kind of generic, to be honest. Solid drawing and fun to watch, but the personalities are just kinda...bland.

    Johnny Quest is really not my cup of tea. Never was much for "adventure" cartoons, myself

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  21. Jonny Quest scared the daylights out of me when I was six, but then, I was always a wimp. It was probably less violent than other shows that premiered that same season (Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and The Man from U.N.C.L.E.), but they were live action and therefore "adult." Maybe it's a question of expectations. Cartoons at that time were usually for kids, so Jonny Quest seemed more violent than it really was.

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